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Marketer of Product That was Endorsed by Alex Jones to Speak at RNC

posted by Breanna Khorrami 0 comments
Alex Jones - citizen slant

A marketer that sells pills based off of pseudo-science – validated by the fact that the product is endorsed by conspiracy theorist Alex Jones – has a primetime speaking slot at the Republican National Convention. 

The marketer, Michelle Van Etten, was presented as a “small business owner” that actually employs over 100,000 people. By no means is Van Etten’s operation “small.”

The Daily Beast reports that the amount of people employed by Van Etten is “rougly 1.5 times the number of employees Apple employs in the United States.”

But, what product does she actually sell?

Van Etten sells pills that supposedly improve health and fight cancer. Without a shadow of a doubt, the product is easily discounted as being based on faulty science.

Janet Helm, nutritionist and registered dietician, validated this claim in saying,

“The whole basis of the products and the claims are pseudoscience.”

Beyond the problematic nature of Van Etten’s product in and of itself is the fact that her product was endorsed by America’s favorite conspiracy theorist and unapologetic Trump supporter, Alex Jones. Jones previously endorsed Youngevity in one video.

Jones stated,

“The only problem is that I’m 22 [years-old] again…The only side effect is that I’m crazed now. Now I can jog 8 miles instead of 4 miles…My testosterone is up.”

Furthermore, it seems that Van Etten’s business practices are questionable in that she employs pyriamid-scheme-style marketing techniques.

According to The Daily Beast,

“Youngevity is a multi-level marketing system focusing on selling nutritional supplements and other products. Multi-level marketing is a sales system in which a salesperson earns money on the sales of each subsequent salesperson he or she recruits.

“The company certainly appears to be a pyramid scheme, advertising unique opportunities through a ‘world class marketing system.’ Rather, it seems like a world-class scam to me,” said Britt Hermes, a former naturopathic doctor and author of The Naturopathic Diaries, a blog aimed at contextualizing the false information proliferated by the naturopathic profession.”

The fact that the Republican National Convention would invite such a person to speak is yet another testimony to the chaos that is this year’s RNC.

The thoughts and opinions expressed here are solely those of the contributor and do not necessarily reflect the views of Citizen Slant.

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