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Is Donald Trump’s Presidential Campaign Going to Hospice?

posted by Breanna Khorrami 1 Comment
How Trump will get 95% of the African-American vote - citizen slant

No matter how much Donald Trump and his supporters want to deny it, Trump’s recent hires at the top of his campaign are a major shake up, period.

The denials are bewildering to say the least. The campaign and its surrogates should own the fact that they are doing a shake up in order to reverse the sustained pattern of their slide in the polls. It’s normal. It happens in sports, in business, and yes, it happens in politics. But far be it from Trumpkins to ever admit to anything.

The real problem in the Trump campaign isn’t the fact of a shake up, it’s the direction of it. Regardless of the fact that Paul Manafort is retaining his title in the campaign, it is very clear that the person who is going to be running thee show is Steve Bannon with the assistance of Kellyanne Conway, the pollster who has been an aggressive surrogate for Trump.

So, putting aside the fact that Trump is replacing experience with utter inexperience, Steve Bannon is among the worst of the inexperienced in this situation.

First, Stephen Bannon has never run a political campaign, let alone a U.S. presidential campaign, and that’s not even considering this presidential campaign. By all accounts, the campaign is already in very bid trouble. It does not have and has never had any recognizable infrastructure. To hire a chief that has had no experience with any political campaign let alone something as sprawling as a presidential campaign seems foolish to say the least.

Second, Stephen Bannon was already doing Donald Trump’s bidding throughout the election cycle — frankly, throughout his employment at Breitbart. Famously, he did not even stand by his reporter when she claimed that Corey Lewandowski, Trump’s then campaign manager, assaulted her.

Bannon has been spreading various negative stories about the left and Hillary Clinton, toiling in various conspiracy theories, all of which helps Trump with his base. Traditionally, it is considered best to have their parties do the negative bidding for a candidate rather than the candidate doing it directly, a rule which Donald Trump has completely ignored already. To bring Bannon into the campaign not only would not only increase the negativity of Trump’s campaign, but also, would risk his credibility by in-housing news and conspiracy theories which are not widely accepted by the general electorate.

Third, Bannon is seen as a highly divisive person. He already had a reputation for this during his time at Breitbart. Many of his reporters have privately so confirmed, and some are even speaking out publicly on Bannon’s character.

The one criticism of Trump’s campaign on which there is virtual universal agreement is that it is overly divisive and overly negative. To bring in a new chief that is known for divisiveness and negativity certainly does not help. Even if Bannon does not formally increase the divisive and negative nature of Trump’s campaign, his presence will color every message that comes from Trump. The immediate reaction will be that it is part of Bannon’s brand.

But perhaps the real reason for the new changes in Trump’s campaign is something more obvious. Trump is clearly an emotionally weak human being — he cannot take the slightest criticism no matter how true, and cannot face up to any of his failures. Trump has looked at his ailing campaign and realized the daunting challenge of running a presidential campaign. Perhaps, he is seeing the writing on the wall, particularly since he seems completely ill-prepared to run a real presidential campaign, let alone become U.S. president.

The conservative talk show host and editor in chief of RightWisconsin.com, Charlie Sykes, seems to have captured it best in less than 140 characters — the only way Trump can understand anything. On Wednesday, Mr. Sykes tweeted “Trump’s campaign has now entered the Hospice Phase. He knows he’s dying and wants to surround himself with his loved ones.”

The thoughts and opinions expressed here are solely those of the contributor and do not necessarily reflect the views of Citizen Slant.

 

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1 Comment

JD at

As someone who had to deal with a friend dying and used Hospice I find the analogy despicable.

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